UNITED STATES
COAST & GEODETIC SURVEY

Original Leveling in Nebraska


The earliest bench marks established by the United States Coast & Geodetic Survey in Nebraska came mostly between the years 1899 - 1902. The material used for these bench marks were generally a 6-inch square limestone post lettered "USBM" or a copper bolt. A spur line from the transcontinentel leveling route through central Kansas left the main route at Abilene, Kansas, and followed the railroad north toward Nebraska, entering the state at the town of Superior. The plan was to begin designating bench marks in Nebraska as "A", "B", "C", and so forth until reaching "Z". The order would then resume with "A1", "B1", etc. Due to an error, there was officially no bench mark "A" in Nebraska, but instead the first one was "B" at the town of Superior. The leveling route then went west and then north to connect with the 98th Meridan Survey's triangulation network at station "Blue Hill". Then the line went north through the cities of Hastings and on to Grand Island leaving permanent bench marks. At Grand Island, a spur line was run westward to connect with the Shelton Baseline of the 98th Meridian Survey. The main leveling then went northeast from Grand Island to the city of Columbus and then north to Norfolk. A spur line was run northeast from Norfolk to Sioux City to connect with the levels already done my the Missouri River Commission. The main route then went north and west from Norfolk to Page where they connected with the Page Baseline of the 98th Meridian Survey and ended there in 1900. The following year, 1901, the levels continued westward across the northern part of the state through Valentine and to Chadron. In 1902 the line continued westward into Wyoming. Another spur line from Chadron was run in 1908 that west northwest into South Dakota.


The link below is a map showing the route of the original leveling in Nebraska.
Original Leveling Route


G
J
L
L1
N1
O1
P1
T1
U1
V1
F2
G2
H2
N2
O2
P2
Q2
R2
S2
T2
W2
Y2
A3
D3
R3
U3
W3
Z3
A4
E4
H4


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© Jerry Penry 2015